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Thebes

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The modern city of Thebes is built on the site of ancient Thebes which was among the most important of Greek antiquity.

The region has been inhabited since Neolithic times and flourished during the Mycenean era (1600-1100 BCE). Ancient Thebes was among the strongest ancient Greek cities and dominated that region of Greece for a large period of the 4th century BCE. It was subjugated by the Romans (197 BCE to 395 CE), while it flourished economically during the Byzantine era (395-1204 CE). The city was known throughout Greece for its silk artisans and its textiles. Conquered by the Ottomans in 1460 CE, it was liberated in 1829 during the Greek Revolution and became part of the Modern Greek state.

Gastronomy

Thebes, being in the heart of Greece, strangely appears not to have a special recipe of its own, precisely because it was not isolated. Its exquisite flavours, along with its wine, have been spreading since antiquity and have been contributing to the overall gastronomic tradition of the country.

Of course, Thebes is a crossroads of important traditions, a place that echoes strong memories of the Asia Minor, the Sarakatsani, the Arvanites, the Pontians and all the population groups that from time to time contributed to the amalgam of the region.

The cuisine of Thebes is expressed with special flavours such as fine meats – the custom of the skewered sow in August is a feast of the senses. The area of ​​the Municipality of Thebes is predominantly rural. The region produces excellent-quality vegetables, fruits, beekeeping products, olive and dairy products, and wines from the numerous wineries in the area.

In the wider area of ​​Thebes the traveller will discover a world of tradition and authenticity. Especially during Apokries (Greek Halloween) there are many customs for the visitor to enjoy, and certainly Thebes and its beautiful countryside and villages are a wonderful destination for groups and families who wish to experience these very special days.

At Kaparelli village and in the morning of the Sunday of Turine, the “Kithaironia” are held: these are events with traditional dances and songs, carousel, plenty of food and wine for locals and visitors.

At the village of Vagia, Gaitanaki takes place on the Sunday of Turin with traditional dances and songs. On Shrove Monday, curated by the Vagia Women’s Associations, the visitor will enjoy the traditional Koulouma and kite flying.

One of the most picturesque folk customs of Boeotia is the Vlach wedding of Thebes. The events start on Tsiknopempti Thursday during Apokries and culminate on Shrove Monday. The “Vlach wedding” is a remnant of the ancient worship of the god Dionysus in the land of great legends, Thebes. This custom, a variation and imitation of a Vlach wedding, is an opportunity to connect the present with the past of Thebes and attracts every year a crowd that enjoys the custom and feasts heartily, with plenty of wine, Lent meze and plenty of teasing!

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a little boy smiling happily at the camera and holding a wood bucket with vegetables from at Perivolaki farm

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